NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND (NCLB) AND NNPS

LEAVE NO CHILD AND NO FAMILY BEHIND

At the NNPS Leadership Development Conferences, sessions were presented on the requirements of No Child Left Behind (NCLB) for schools, districts, and states to communicate with families and involve them in their children’s education.

REQUIREMENTS FOR INFORMATION ON EDUCATION

Phyllis McClure, consultant to NNPS and an expert in Title I program requirements, provided four summaries of the requirements for schools, districts, and states to report specific information to parents and the public.

PARENTS' RIGHT TO KNOW CHILD'S AND SCHOOL'S ACHIEVEMENT
Reports on individual student’s test scores

PUBLIC SCHOOL CHOICE
Reports on options for parents to choose new schools if child’s school does not make Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)

SUPPLEMENTAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES
Information for parents of eligible students to select tutoring or other supplementary academic services.

THE PUBLIC'S RIGHT TO KNOW
Annual School Report Cards, District Report Cards, and State Report Cards with information to compare and monitor progress of schools and groups of students within schools on tests and other aspects of school programs.

IDEAS TO IMPLEMENT NEW NCLBA REQUIREMENTS
Members of NNPS produced many ideas for activities and approaches to meet the NCLB reporting requirements.

NCLB REQUIREMENTS FOR EFFECTIVE FAMILY INVOLVEMENT PROGRAMS

Joyce Epstein, Director of NNPS, provided information on how the research-based framework and approaches of NNPS help schools, districts and states meet the NCLB requirements for parental involvement in Section 1118.

SUMMARY: LINKS OF NNPS WITH NCLBA
How NNPS members can “lead the way” in meeting NCLB requirements for family and community involvement.

HOW NNPS HELPS SCHOOLS, DISTRICTS, AND STATES MEET NCLBA DIRECTIVES IN SECTION 1118
How NNPS approaches help schools, districts, and states fulfill and exceed NCLB requirements in Section 1118 for Parental Involvement.


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NNPS Research on NCLB and Parental Involvement

Researchers at NNPS have written perspectives and conducted studies on whether and how districts and schools can meet NCLB’s requirements for parental involvement.

General Overviews and Perspectives

Epstein, J. L. (2005). Attainable goals? The spirit and letter of the No Child Left Behind Act on parental involvement. Sociology of Education, 78(2): 179-182.

Epstein, J. L. (2004). How middle schools can meet NCLB requirements for family involvement. Middle Ground (NMSA), 8(1):14-17.

Analyses of Data from Districts and Schools

Epstein, J. L. (2008). Research meets policy and practice: How are school districts addressing NCLB requirements for parental involvement? Pp. 267-279 in A. R. Sadovnik, J. O’ Day, G. Bohrnstedt, and K. Borman (Eds.). No Child Left Behind and the reduction of the achievement gap: Sociological perspectives on federal educational policy. NY: Routledge.

Sanders, M. G. (2005) Helping low-performing schools leave no child behind: A case study in district leadership for school, family, and community partnerships. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association (AERA), April, Montreal.

Sheldon, S. B. (2008). Getting families involved with NCLB: Factors affecting schools’ enactment of federal policy. Pp.281-294 in A. R. Sadovnik, J. O’ Day, G. Bohrnstedt, and K. Borman (Eds.). No Child Left Behind and the reduction of the achievement gap: Sociological perspectives on federal educational policy. NY: Routledge.

Contact the researchers for other research and publications that are in progress.

For more information on NCLB, visit www.nclb.gov.